The American West in the Camargue: Film, Material Culture and Regionalist Primitivism, c. 1912

Emily C. Burns, PhD and Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Art History, Auburn University, Alabama, will deliver a public lecture titled “The American West in the Camargue: Film, Material Culture and Regionalist Primitivism, c. 1912,” on Friday, September 29, at 7 p.m., in the Mary Eddy and Fred Jones Auditorium of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., in the OU Arts District. The illustrated lecture is open to the public with no admission charge and is presented by the OU School of Visual Arts’ Charles M. Russell Center for the Study of Art of the American West, as part of the Merkel Family Foundation Distinguished Lecture Series. Professor Burns is the author of the book, Transnational Frontiers: the American West in the French Imagination, forthcoming from the University of Oklahoma Press as part of the Charles M. Russell Center Series on Art and Photography of the American West. Professor Burns will address connections between art and popular culture in early 20th century visual representations of the American West and Native Americans from French, U.S., and Native American perspectives. “In 1912, French director Jean Durand released Prairie en feu (Prairie on Fire), a film that recreated a US frontier village in the Camargue, a rural region in the south of France. While the film’s portrayal of settlers and Indians might be seen as performing stereotypical myths of the American West, this talk unravels its constellation of referents in dialogues with Lakota performers of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, American Indian art and...